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Publication-only abstracts (abstract number preceded by an "e"), published in conjunction with the 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting but not presented at the Meeting, can be found online only.

Association of patient characteristics with real-world ROS1 NSCLC testing patterns among community practices in the United States.

Sub-category:
Quality of Care/Quality Improvement

Category:
Health Services Research, Clinical Informatics, and Quality of Care

Meeting:
2019 ASCO Annual Meeting

Abstract No:
e18321

Citation:
J Clin Oncol 37, 2019 (suppl; abstr e18321)

Author(s): William Bruce Wong, Ning Wu, Ravindra Gupta, Aaron Scott Mansfield; Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA; Genentech, South San Francisco, CA; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

Abstract Disclosures

Abstract:

Background: Despite the availability of targeted therapy for ROS1 NSCLC since 2016, there is limited information on real-world ROS1 testing practices to identify patients potentially eligible for targeted treatment among community practices. The objective of this study was to characterize ROS1 testing rates and identify potential barriers to ROS1 testing. Methods: The Flatiron Health EHR-derived database was used to identify patients diagnosed with advanced NSCLC between 7/1/2016 - 7/30/2018 and received systemic treatment in a community practice setting. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the population, biomarker testing rates and timing of testing. Logistic and multinomial regressions including patient demographics and clinical characteristics were used to identify factors associated with the following outcomes: ROS1 testing, testing for biomarkers other than ROS1 (PDL1, ALK, EGFR) , longer times from advanced diagnosis (adv. dx) to ROS1 test results and initiation of therapy prior to ROS1 testing. Results: Of 9,275 eligible patients, ROS1 testing rates in squamous (SQ) and non-squamous histologies increased over the study period (30% to 52%, 62% to 75% respectively). Older age, males, poorer performance status, SQ histology, history of smoking and recurrent disease (RD) patients were significantly less likely to be tested. Among patients not tested for ROS1, 62% were tested for other biomarkers including > 50% of non-squamous patients tested for PDL1, EGFR or ALK and 51% of squamous patients tested for PDL1. The median time from adv. dx to test result was 24 days, with patient characteristics (i.e. Hispanic ethnicity, history of smoking) as well as test type predicting longer times to test results ( > 41 days vs. < 24 days after adv. dx). Patients who had a delay in test results were more likely to receive other therapy prior to availability of their ROS1 test results (25+ days vs. < 24 days OR [95% CI]: 9.18 [7.87, 10.70]). Conclusions: In real-world practice, patient characteristics were associated with ROS1 testing and testing delays which may result in some patient subgroups being less likely to be identified for potential targeted therapy.

 
Other Abstracts in this Sub-Category:

 

1. Effect of montelukast and rupatadine on rituximab infusion time, rate, severity of reactions, and cost of administration.

Meeting: 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting Abstract No: 6500 First Author: Rouslan Kotchetkov
Category: Health Services Research, Clinical Informatics, and Quality of Care - Quality of Care/Quality Improvement

 

2. Comparison of normal saline versus heparin flush solutions for maintaining patency of central venous catheter in cancer patients.

Meeting: 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting Abstract No: 6501 First Author: Amy Pai
Category: Health Services Research, Clinical Informatics, and Quality of Care - Quality of Care/Quality Improvement

 

3. Preventing excess narcotic prescriptions in MIS urologic oncology discharges (PENN): A prospective cohort quality improvement initiative.

Meeting: 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting Abstract No: 6502 First Author: Ruchika Talwar
Category: Health Services Research, Clinical Informatics, and Quality of Care - Quality of Care/Quality Improvement

 

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