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Publication-only abstracts (abstract number preceded by an "e"), published in conjunction with the 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting but not presented at the Meeting, can be found online only.

Effects of a personal trainer led exercise intervention on physical activity and physical function of breast cancer survivors.

Sub-category:
Health Promotion

Category:
Symptoms and Survivorship

Meeting:
2019 ASCO Annual Meeting

Abstract No:
e23053

Citation:
J Clin Oncol 37, 2019 (suppl; abstr e23053)

Author(s): Linda F. Wang, Yvonne L. Eaglehouse, Janette T. Poppenberg, Jill Brufsky, Emily Geramita, Shuyan Zhai, Kelliann Davis, Bethany Gibbs, Jason Metz, G J. Van Londen; University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA; John P. Murtha Cancer Center Research Program, Bethesda, MD; Our Clubhouse, Pittsburgh, PA; University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA; University of Pittsburgh Hillman Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, PA; University of Pittsburgh School of Education, Pittsburgh, PA; West Liberty University, West Liberty, WV

Abstract Disclosures

Abstract:

Background: Regular exercise is an important tool to address physical and emotional effects of breast cancer treatment. However, many breast cancer survivors do not meet minimum recommended levels of physical activity. This study examines effects of a personal trainer led exercise intervention on physical activity levels and physical function in breast cancer survivors. Methods: Women who completed active treatment for breast cancer were recruited from oncology clinics and survivorship programs from September 2015-to September 2017. Subjects were randomized to an immediate exercise or a wait-list control group. The intervention included 3 personal training sessions over a period of up to 30 weeks. Physical activity and function were assessed before and after intervention by pedometer (7-day record) and endurance step test (steps in 2 minutes). Results: 60 women were randomized to immediate intervention (n = 31) or wait-list control (n = 29). Subjects were an average of (mean ± SD) 56 ± 10 years old and 2 ± 1 years since breast cancer diagnosis. At baseline, the exercise group averaged (mean ± SD) 5236 ± 2214 steps/day and 101 ± 23 steps on 2-minute step test while the control group averaged 5856 ± 2916 steps/day and 106 ± 23 steps on 2-minute step test. After intervention, change (mean ∆± SD) was 143 ± 1842 steps/day in the exercise group and 79 ± 1862 steps/day in the control group (p= 0.9). On the 2-minute step test, the exercise group increased 18 ± 20 steps and the control group increased 9 ± 12 steps (p= 0.07). Conclusions: While there was some improvement in physical function after the personal-trainer led intervention, the short duration and intensity of the intervention may have diminished the effects. Our results suggest a multi-faceted approach may be needed to support significant changes in breast cancer survivors’ physical activity. Future efforts employing a multidisciplinary team, which includes a certified personal trainer, and with larger patient samples may help address this possibility. Clinical trial information: NCT02770781

 
Other Abstracts in this Sub-Category:

 

1. Effects of a structured intervention program to improve physical activity (PA) of adolescents and young adult cancer survivors (AYAs): Final results of the randomized Motivate AYA–MAYA trial.

Meeting: 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting Abstract No: 11518 First Author: Jannike Lisa Salchow
Category: Symptoms and Survivorship - Health Promotion

 

2. Association of obesity with breast cancer outcome in relation to cancer subtypes.

Meeting: 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting Abstract No: 11557 First Author: Ana Elisa Lohmann
Category: Symptoms and Survivorship - Health Promotion

 

3. Physiological and psychosocial effects of a highly structured exercise program on breast cancer survivorship.

Meeting: 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting Abstract No: 11558 First Author: Judy A. Tjoe
Category: Symptoms and Survivorship - Health Promotion

 

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