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Attend this session at the
2017 ASCO Annual Meeting!


Session: Patient and Survivor Care

Type: Poster Session

Time: Saturday June 3, 1:15 PM to 4:45 PM

Location: Hall A


Session: Patient and Survivor Care

Type: Poster Discussion Session

Time: Saturday June 3, 4:45 PM to 6:00 PM

Location: S404

Randomized trial of a cognitive-behavioral therapy mobile app for anxiety in patients with incurable cancer.

Sub-category:
Psychosocial Research

Category:
Patient and Survivor Care

Meeting:
2017 ASCO Annual Meeting

Abstract No:
10022

Poster Board Number:
Poster Discussion Session (Board #11)

Citation:
J Clin Oncol 35, 2017 (suppl; abstr 10022)

Author(s): Joseph Greer, Jamie M. Jacobs, Nicole Pensak, James MacDonald, Charn-Xin Fuh, Giselle Katiria Perez, Alina Ward, Anne Holt, Colleen Tallen, Alona Muzikansky, Lara N. Traeger, Frank J. Penedo, Steven Safren, William F. Pirl, Jennifer S. Temel; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; University of Colorado, Denver, CO; University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; Lee Memorial Health System, Fort Myers, FL; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL; Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami, Miami, FL

Abstract Disclosures

Abstract:

Background: Patients with incurable cancer often experience marked anxiety that is associated with poor quality of life (QOL), high symptom burden, and complications with medical treatment. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of a mobile app-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention to treat anxiety symptoms in patients with incurable cancer. Methods: From 2/15 to 8/16, 145 patients with incurable cancers (e.g., advanced lung, breast, GI/GU, sarcoma, melanoma) who screened positive for at least mild anxiety symptoms (Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale-Anxiety subscale, HADS-A > 7) were randomized 1:1 at two cancer centers to receive either the CBT mobile app for anxiety or a mobile health education program (control), delivered via tablet computers. The CBT app included 7 modules teaching skills to relax the body, reduce worry, stay present-focused, improve communication, and plan/pace activities, which patients completed over 12 weeks. To assess anxiety, mood, and QOL, we administered the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI), HADS, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General at baseline and 12 weeks. General linear models were used to assess the effect of the intervention on patient outcomes over time. Results: The sample was predominantly female (73.8%) and white (91.7%), with a mean age of 56.45 (SD= 11.30) years. Both study groups reported significant improvements in anxiety, depression, and QOL from baseline to post-assessment (all p-values≤002), with no differences in the improved outcomes between groups. Secondary analyses showed interaction effects on anxiety between the intervention and baseline HAM-A scores. Among patients with higher baseline anxiety, those randomized to the CBT app had greater improvements on the HAM-A (p= .043), CGI (p= .048), and HADS-A (p= .001) compared to the health education control group. Conclusions: Patients with incurable cancer who received either a CBT mobile app intervention or mobile health education program reported improvements in anxiety, depression, and QOL. However, the CBT mobile app had better outcomes than health education for patients with higher baseline anxiety. Clinical trial information: NCT02286466

 
Other Abstracts in this Sub-Category:

 

1. Web-based stress management for newly diagnosed cancer patients (STREAM): A randomized, wait-list controlled intervention study.

Meeting: 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting Abstract No: LBA10002 First Author: Viviane Hess
Category: Patient and Survivor Care - Psychosocial Research

 

2. Cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer survivors: A longitudinal analysis compared to matched controls.

Meeting: 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting Abstract No: 10045 First Author: AnnaLynn Williams
Category: Patient and Survivor Care - Psychosocial Research

 

3. Utility of the Stanford Integrated Psychosocial Assessment for Transplantation (SIPAT) in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

Meeting: 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting Abstract No: 10046 First Author: Patricia B. Mumby
Category: Patient and Survivor Care - Psychosocial Research

 

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