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Publication-only abstracts (abstract number preceded by an "e"), published in conjunction with the 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting but not presented at the Meeting, can be found online only.

Olanzapine versus aprepitant in the prevention of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in breast cancer patients.

Sub-category:
Symptom Management/Supportive Care/Palliative Care

Category:
Patient and Survivor Care

Meeting:
2017 ASCO Annual Meeting

Abstract No:
e21670

Citation:
J Clin Oncol 35, 2017 (suppl; abstr e21670)

Author(s): S Mukesh, Sathya M, Akshay Jk; Mysore Medical College and Research Institute, Mysore, India

Abstract Disclosures

Abstract:

Background: Olanzapine has been shown to be a safe and effective agent for the prevention of CINV. This study aims to compare olanzapine with aprepitant in the prevention of CINV. Methods: This study included breast cancer patients receiving doxorubicin 60mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 600mg/m2 chemotherapy. Female patient; age, ≥ 18; chemotherapy naïve; no nausea/ vomiting in the past 24 hours were included. Patients with seizure disorder, brain metastasis, prior use of antipsychotic agents and hypersensitivity to olanzapine were excluded. Patients were randomized into two groups. Olanzapine group received tab olanzapine 10 mg on day 1 to 3. Aprepitant group received tab.aprepitant 125mg on day 1 and 80mg on days 2-3. Both groups received inj palnosteron 0.25mg, inj dexamethasone 8mg on day 1. Use of rescue therapy for nausea or vomiting was permitted. The primary end point of the study was complete response (CR) for nausea that is no nausea in the acute (within 24 hours), delayed (days 2-5), and overall periods (0-120 hours). Secondary endpoint was CR for vomiting and no use of rescue drugs in all periods. Beginning with the first day of chemotherapy and daily through day 5, patients were asked to record daily episodes of nausea using a visual analogue scale from 0 to 10, with 0 indicating no nausea and 10 indicating a maximal level of nausea. They were asked to record daily episodes of vomiting (number and time) and the utilization of rescue therapy. Results: A total of 84 patients (42 in each arm) were evaluated and consented for the study. The median age 48 years; range 29-80; ECOG PS - 0, 1. CR for nausea was 84% for the acute period , 58% for the delayed period and 56% for the overall period for the olanzapine group. CR for nausea in aprepitant group was 69% acute period, 55% delayed period, and 55% for the overall period. CR for vomiting was 91% acute; 74% delayed; 70% overall period for olanzapine group. CR for vomiting in aprepitant group was 91% acute; 83% delayed; 83% overall period. There were no Grade 3 /4 toxicities. Conclusions: Olanzapine is better in the prevention of nausea. However aprepitant is better in the prevention of vomiting. Combination of these two agents needs to be studied in future studies.

 
Other Abstracts in this Sub-Category:

 

1. Managing cancer and living meaningfully (CALM): A randomized controlled trial of a psychological intervention for patients with advanced cancer.

Meeting: 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting Abstract No: LBA10001 First Author: Gary Rodin
Category: Patient and Survivor Care - Symptom Management/Supportive Care/Palliative Care

 

2. SCORAD III: Randomized noninferiority phase III trial of single-dose radiotherapy (RT) compared to multifraction RT in patients (pts) with metastatic spinal canal compression (SCC).

Meeting: 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting Abstract No: LBA10004 First Author: Peter Hoskin
Category: Patient and Survivor Care - Symptom Management/Supportive Care/Palliative Care

 

3. Effect of inpatient palliative care during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) hospitalization on psychological distress at six months post-HCT.

Meeting: 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting Abstract No: 10005 First Author: Areej El-Jawahri
Category: Patient and Survivor Care - Symptom Management/Supportive Care/Palliative Care

 

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